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A day in the Life Of a Rome La Sapienza student

at our University in Rome, La Sapienza
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Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 8:40 pm

Re: A day in the Life Of a Rome La Sapienza student

Postby EdoardoTB » Mon Mar 09, 2015 10:51 am

Well, we usually have lectures in the morning. Mandatory lab activity is very limited. This allows students to self-tailor their studies. Activities at the hospital officially start on 2nd semester of 3rd year. Same thing holds for those: every student goes through the different wards, but still you can choose what you want to focus on. This kind of organization allows for more flexibility.

In general, our life is pretty busy, but still we have time for ourselves and for a few extra academic activities (e.g. sports and hobbies).

Did you have a more specific question maybe?
Edoardo, 4th medical student (now spending my 4th year abroad!)

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Re: A day in the Life Of a Rome La Sapienza student

Postby EdoardoTB » Tue Mar 10, 2015 2:37 pm

Honestly speaking, transportation in Rome, compared to the other European capitals, definitely sucks. The underground service is poor and there are a lot of buses. This is the reason why you should be pay attention when choosing the location of your accommodation: not all areas of the city are as well as connected to the University.
I would say that you would suffer a little bit if you come from a big European city (e.g. Berlin or London), otherwise you simply won't notice the difference :)

For what concern the hospital, yes, they are one next to the other (Policlinico Umberto I is the teaching hospital).
Edoardo, 4th medical student (now spending my 4th year abroad!)

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